The Story of the Mikado W.S. Gilbert

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The Story of the Mikado  by  W.S. Gilbert

The Story of the Mikado by W.S. Gilbert
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This book is a literary adaption of the comic opera The Mikado. The story is W.S. Gilberts last literary work. The retelling of The Mikado comes with various changes to simplify language and make it more suitable for a younger audience.The Mikado-MoreThis book is a literary adaption of the comic opera The Mikado. The story is W.S. Gilberts last literary work. The retelling of The Mikado comes with various changes to simplify language and make it more suitable for a younger audience.The Mikado- or, The Town of Titipu is a comic opera in two acts, with music by Arthur Sullivan and libretto by W.

S. Gilbert, their ninth of fourteen operatic collaborations. It opened on March 14, 1885, in London, where it ran at the Savoy Theatre for 672 performances, which was the second longest run for any work of musical theatre and one of the longest runs of any theatre piece up to that time. Before the end of 1885, it was estimated that, in Europe and America, at least 150 companies were producing the opera. The Mikado remains the most frequently performed Savoy Opera, and it is especially popular with amateur and school productions. The work has been translated into numerous languages and is one of the most frequently played musical theatre pieces in history.In Act I, gentlemen of the Japanese town of Titipu are gathered (If you want to know who we are).

A wandering musician, Nanki-Poo, enters and introduces himself (A wandring minstrel I). He inquires about his beloved, the maiden Yum-Yum, a ward of Ko-Ko (formerly a cheap tailor). One of the gentlemen, Pish-Tush, explains that when the Mikado decreed that flirting was a capital crime, the Titipu authorities frustrated the decree by appointing Ko-Ko, a prisoner condemned to death for flirting, to the post of Lord High Executioner (Our great Mikado, virtuous man). Ko-Ko was next to be decapitated, and the Titipu authorities reasoned that he could not cut off anothers head until he cut his own off, and since Ko-Ko was not likely to try to execute himself, no executions could take place.

However, all officials but the haughty Pooh-Bah proved too proud to serve under an ex-tailor, and Pooh-Bah now holds all their posts—and collects all their salaries. Pooh-Bah informs Nanki-Poo that Yum-Yum is scheduled to marry Ko-Ko on that very day (Young man, despair).Ko-Ko enters (Behold the Lord High Executioner), and asserts himself by reading off a list of people who would not be missed if they were executed (As some day it may happen). Soon, Yum-Yum appears with two of her friends (sometimes referred to as her sisters), Peep-Bo and Pitti-Sing (Comes a train of little ladies, Three little maids from school).

Ko-Ko encourages a respectful greeting between Pooh-Bah and the young girls, but Pooh-Bah will have none of it (So please you, sir). Nanki-Poo arrives on the scene and informs Ko-Ko of his love for Yum-Yum. Ko-Ko sends him away, but Nanki-Poo manages to meet with his beloved and reveals his secret to Yum-Yum—he is the son and heir of the Mikado, but hes travelling in disguise to avoid the amorous advances of Katisha, an elderly lady of his fathers court.

They lament over what the law forbids them to do (Were you not to Ko-Ko plighted).Ko-Ko receives news that the Mikado has decreed that unless an execution is carried out within a month, the town will be reduced to the rank of a village—which would bring irretrievable ruin. Pooh-Bah and Pish-Tush point to Ko-Ko himself as the obvious choice for beheading, since he was already under sentence of death (I am so proud), but Ko-Ko protests that, firstly, it would be extremely difficult, not to say dangerous, for him to attempt to execute himself, and secondly, it would be suicide, which is a capital offence.

Fortuitously, Ko-Ko discovers that Nanki-Poo, in despair over losing Yum-Yum, is preparing to commit suicide.



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